• Automatic Weapons: American vs. German 1943 War Department (US Army); World War II

    Firearms playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL22A5611941174745 more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "A comparison of American and German automatic weapons Accuracy vs. Firepower" War Department film FB-181 Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.o...

    published: 04 Apr 2016
  • 1943 US War Department Anti-Fascist PSA

    In 1943, the US government created and distributed an anti-fascism PSA that showed man realizing the danger in fascist propaganda and hateful rhetoric. At one point he says, "He's talking about me." I don't know who owns the copyright on this short film, but I offer it under the basic YouTube license and hope it's permitted to stay up. This should be watched and shared. #hatehasnohomehere

    published: 14 Aug 2017
  • U.S. war department anti-Japanese propaganda film 1945

    Help us caption and translate this video on Amara.org: http://www.amara.org/en/v/B1rL/ Clip from an archival 1945 World War II propaganda film released by the U.S. War Department entitled "Know Your Enemy: Japan." You can watch the hour-long film in its entirety for free at the Media Burn Archive: http://mediaburn.org/video/know-your-enemy-japan/ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/B1rL/

    published: 02 Jun 2009
  • Combat: "Kill Or Be Killed" 1943 War Department; World War II; US Army Training Film

    more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "Fighting Men: Kill or Be Killed - Department of Defense. Department of the Army... This military training film shows that there are no rules of sportsmanship or fair play on the battlefield. As expressed in the film: 'Anything goes when the stakes are kill or be killed.' Soldiers were encouraged to use any weapon that comes to hand which could be anything from a rifle, to a bayonet or hand grenade." US Army training film TF21-1024 Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild v...

    published: 04 Dec 2015
  • War Department: Culp's Hill

    Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Licensed Battlefield Guide Tim Smith and The Civil War Trust's Sam Smith debate whether or not the Confederate Army should have tried to take Culp's Hill on the first night of The Battle of Gettysburg.

    published: 31 May 2017
  • War Department Martial ArtsTraining - Part 1

    Training video from 1940s

    published: 24 Apr 2008
  • War Department: Unknown Little Round Top

    You think you know Little Round Top? Licensed Battlefield Guides Garry Adelman and Tim Smith take viewers on a tour of some of the lesser known facts about the hill.

    published: 19 Apr 2017
  • War Department Films of Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany

    published: 07 Apr 2012
  • Radar Secrets ~ 1945 War Department; narrated by Arthur Kennedy

    Radar playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL980B7449450779A2 more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ Post World War II explanation of radar and how it was used in the war. Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radar ...In 1922 A. Hoyt Taylor and Leo...

    published: 22 Sep 2016
  • Dogs in WWII: "The Use of War Dogs" 1943 War Department (US Army); K-9 Corps

    more at http://quickfound.net Overview of the work done by Army dogs in World War II. War Dept Film Bulletin 91. 'This film shows war dogs as they were trained by the Remount Section of the Quartermaster Corps. Scenes show dogs as they were being trained to lead patrols, to silently warn of the presence of enemies, and to seek out intruders. Scenes also show a messenger dog demonstrating how to deliver a message and return with needed ammunition; messenger dogs delivering carrier pigeons; laying wire on a battlefield; and a casualty dog helping his master locate wounded soldiers on a battlefield. Creator: Department of Defense. Department of the Army. Office of the Chief Signal Officer. (09/18/1947 - 02/28/1964) (Most Recent)' Public domain film from the United States National Archives...

    published: 17 Sep 2013
  • Strictly Personal - War Department official training film (US Army Pictorial Service, 1945)

    This film presents advice on fitness and health to servicewomen -- nutrition, rest, exercise, etc. The film gives an explanation of menses, personal hygiene, prevention of disease, care of the feet, etc. Produced by United States Army Pictorial Service Learn more about this film and search its transcript at NLM Digital Collections: http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/9422795 Learn more about the National Library of Medicine's historical audiovisuals program at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/films

    published: 08 Aug 2013
  • Death Mills 1945 US War Department Film

    Presented here for historical purposes, this film was released by the United States Department of War in 1945. It's purpose was to educate the German people about atrocities committed by the Nazi regime during the Holocaust. It contains footage of various liberated concentration camps, including the Majdanek death camp, the first of its kind to be liberated during the war. As this film was produced Department of War, which was a United States federal agency (its known as the defense department today), this film is in the public domain per 17 U.S.C. § 105

    published: 30 Apr 2015
  • Racial & Religious Propaganda: "Don't Be a Sucker" 1945 War Department Education Film; World War II

    World War II playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E5ED4749AE3CD2C Psychology & Social Guidance Films playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_KKDUI3dzMqPn1uZRXt_8dp more at http://quickfound.net 'Dramatizes the destructive effects of racial and religious prejudice. Reel 1 shows a fake wrestling match and "crooked" gambling games. An agitator addresses a street crowd; he almost convinces one man in the audience until the man begins to talk to a Hungarian refugee from Germany. A Nazi speaker harangues a crowd in Germany denouncing Jews, Catholics, and Freemasons. Reel 2, a German unemployed worker joins Hitler's Storm Troops. SS men attack Jewish and Catholic headquarters in Germany, and beat up a Jewish storekeeper. A German teacher explains Nazi racial t...

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • Don't Be A Sucker (1947) | U.S. War Department

    Don't believe the haters Full movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag40XYIj4hE

    published: 30 Jan 2017
  • War Department: The Myth of Stonewall Jackson

    Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Garry Adelman debunks myths regarding Thomas Jackson's famous nickname in this episode of the War Department™ video series by the Civil War Trust.

    published: 19 Jul 2017
  • War Department: Shock and Awe at Bull Run

    Civil War Trust and National Park Service staff analyze the Battle of Bull Run in this episode of the War Department™ video series by the Civil War Trust. Learn More at: http://www.civilwar.org/education/war-department/

    published: 10 Apr 2017
  • Official Training Film War Department (1942) - Sex Hygiene

    published: 31 May 2013
  • U.S. War Department: "Tale of Two Cities" 1946 - Nagasaki & Hiroshima Nuclear Bombs

    published: 11 Nov 2011
  • War Department: A Bloodstained Artifact from Gettysburg

    Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Garry Adelman and Douglas Ullman, Jr. meet with Wayne Motts of The National Civil War Museum to look at artifacts owned by Captain Henry Fuller, who was killed in The Battle of Gettysburg. Adelman and Small also visit the site where Fuller took his final breaths.

    published: 15 Aug 2017
  • Official Training Film War Department (1945) - The M2 Carbine

    published: 31 May 2013
  • 1916 Sunbeam War Department Motorcycle

    1916 built Sunbeam War Department Model Motorcycle, as used in the First World War by dispatch riders of the Royal Engineers

    published: 05 Oct 2008
  • Americans! "Don't Be A Sucker" - U.S. War Department

    Don't Be a Sucker by U.S. War Department View the full-length video: https://archive.org/details/DontBeaS1947 Publication date 1947 Usage Public Domain Topics Prejudice, Cold War, Racism Digitizing sponsor U.S. War Department Admonishes Americans that they will lose their country if they let fanaticism and hatred turn them into "suckers." "Let's forget about 'we' and 'they' -- let's think about us!" In the context of the emerging Cold War, this film appears paradoxical. Shotlist Like The House I Live In, this film warns that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into "suckers" by the forces of fanaticism and hatred. This thesis is rendered more powerful by the ever-present example of Nazi Germany, whose capsule history is dramatized as part of this film. ...

    published: 13 Aug 2017
  • War Department: Berdan's Sharpshooters at Gettysburg

    Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Garry Adelman, Douglas Ullman Jr. and Kristopher White of the Civil War Trust are joined by Greg Goodell of the Gettysburg National Military Park to examine an impressive collection of artifacts from the U.S. Sharpshooters.

    published: 29 Sep 2017
  • Post-WW2 Anti-Fascist Educational Film | Don't Be a Sucker | 1947

    ● CHECK OUT OUR 2ND CHANNEL: https://youtube.com/TheBestSpaceArchives ✚ Watch our "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaGAbbh1M3ImKavW8ZY0aZyFK1c-PLCAj ►Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmArchives ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BestFilmArch Don't Be a Sucker! is a short educational film produced by the U.S. War Department in 1943 and re-released in 1947. The film depicts the rise of Nazism in Germany and warns Americans against repeating the mistakes of intolerance made in Nazi Germany. It emphasizes that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into "suckers" by the forces of fanaticism and hatred. The film was made to make the case for the desegregation of the United States ...

    published: 12 Mar 2017
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Automatic Weapons: American vs. German 1943 War Department (US Army); World War II

Automatic Weapons: American vs. German 1943 War Department (US Army); World War II

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:37
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2016
  • views: 55712
videos
Firearms playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL22A5611941174745 more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "A comparison of American and German automatic weapons Accuracy vs. Firepower" War Department film FB-181 Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StG_44 The StG 44 (Sturmgewehr 44, literally "storm (or assault) rifle (model of 19)44") was an assault rifle developed in Nazi Germany during World War II that was the first of its kind to see major deployment and is considered by many historians to be the first modern assault rifle It is also known under the designations MP 43 and MP 44 (Maschinenpistole 43, Maschinenpistole 44 respectively), which denote earlier development versions of the same weapon with some differences like a different butt end, muzzle nut, shape of the front sight base or with an unstepped barrel, all only visible with close inspection. MP 43, MP 44, and StG 44 were different designations for what was essentially the same rifle, with minor updates in production. The variety in nomenclatures resulted from the complicated bureaucracy in Nazi Germany. Developed from the Mkb 42(H) "machine carbine", the StG44 combined the characteristics of a carbine, submachine gun and automatic rifle. StG is an abbreviation of Sturmgewehr. The name was chosen for propaganda reasons and literally means "storm rifle" as in "to storm (i.e. "assault") an enemy position". After the adoption of the StG 44, the English translation "assault rifle" became the accepted designation for this type of infantry small arm. The rifle was chambered for the 7.92×33mm Kurz cartridge. This shorter version of the German standard (7.92x57mm) rifle round... had less range and power than the more powerful infantry rifles of the day, Wehrmacht studies had shown that most combat engagements occurred at less than 300 m, with the majority within 200 m... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thompson_submachine_gun The Thompson is an American submachine gun, invented by John T. Thompson in 1919, that became infamous during the Prohibition era. It was a common sight in the media of the time, being used by both law enforcement officers and criminals. The Thompson was also known informally as: the "Tommy Gun", "Trench Broom", "Trench Sweeper", "Chicago Typewriter", "Chicago Piano", "Chicago Style", and "The Chopper"... Development The Thompson Submachine Gun was developed by General John T. Thompson who originally envisioned an auto rifle (semi-automatic rifle) to replace the bolt action service rifles then in use. While searching for a way to allow such a weapon to operate safely without the complexity of a recoil or gas operated mechanism, Thompson came across a patent issued to John Bell Blish in 1915 based on adhesion of inclined metal surfaces under pressure. Thompson found a financial backer, Thomas F. Ryan, and started the Auto-Ordnance Company in 1916 for the purpose of developing his auto rifle. The principal designers were Theodore H. Eickhoff, Oscar V. Payne, and George E. Goll. By late 1917, the limits of the Blish Principle were discovered: rather than working as a locked breech, it functioned as a friction-delayed blowback action. It was found that the only cartridge currently in U.S. service suitable for use with the lock was the .45 ACP round. Thompson then envisioned a "one-man, hand-held machine gun" in .45 ACP as a "trench broom" for use in the on-going trench warfare of World War I. Payne designed the gun itself and its stick and drum magazines. The project was then titled "Annihilator I", and by 1918, most of the design issues had been resolved. However, the war ended before prototypes could be shipped to Europe. At an Auto-Ordnance board meeting in 1919 to discuss the marketing of the "Annihilator", with the war over, the weapon was officially renamed the "Thompson Submachine Gun". While other weapons had been developed shortly prior with similar objectives in mind, the Thompson was the first weapon to be labeled and marketed as a "submachine gun".... Early use The Thompson first entered production as the M1921. It was available to civilians, though its high price resulted in few sales. (A Thompson with one Type XX 20 shot "stick" magazine was priced at $200.00, at a time when a Ford automobile sold for $400.00.) ...
https://wn.com/Automatic_Weapons_American_Vs._German_1943_War_Department_(Us_Army)_World_War_Ii
1943 US War Department Anti-Fascist PSA

1943 US War Department Anti-Fascist PSA

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:41
  • Updated: 14 Aug 2017
  • views: 35746
videos
In 1943, the US government created and distributed an anti-fascism PSA that showed man realizing the danger in fascist propaganda and hateful rhetoric. At one point he says, "He's talking about me." I don't know who owns the copyright on this short film, but I offer it under the basic YouTube license and hope it's permitted to stay up. This should be watched and shared. #hatehasnohomehere
https://wn.com/1943_US_War_Department_Anti_Fascist_Psa
U.S. war department anti-Japanese propaganda film 1945

U.S. war department anti-Japanese propaganda film 1945

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:49
  • Updated: 02 Jun 2009
  • views: 177359
videos
Help us caption and translate this video on Amara.org: http://www.amara.org/en/v/B1rL/ Clip from an archival 1945 World War II propaganda film released by the U.S. War Department entitled "Know Your Enemy: Japan." You can watch the hour-long film in its entirety for free at the Media Burn Archive: http://mediaburn.org/video/know-your-enemy-japan/ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/B1rL/
https://wn.com/U.S._War_Department_Anti_Japanese_Propaganda_Film_1945
Combat: "Kill Or Be Killed" 1943 War Department; World War II; US Army Training Film

Combat: "Kill Or Be Killed" 1943 War Department; World War II; US Army Training Film

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:29
  • Updated: 04 Dec 2015
  • views: 11574
videos
more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "Fighting Men: Kill or Be Killed - Department of Defense. Department of the Army... This military training film shows that there are no rules of sportsmanship or fair play on the battlefield. As expressed in the film: 'Anything goes when the stakes are kill or be killed.' Soldiers were encouraged to use any weapon that comes to hand which could be anything from a rifle, to a bayonet or hand grenade." US Army training film TF21-1024 Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hand-to-hand_combat Hand-to-hand combat (sometimes abbreviated as HTH or H2H) is a lethal or nonlethal physical confrontation between two or more persons at very short range (grappling distance) that does not involve the use of firearms or other distance weapons. While the phrase "hand-to-hand" appears to refer to unarmed combat, the term is generic and may include use of striking weapons used at grappling distance such as knives, sticks, batons, or improvised weapons such as entrenching tools. While the term hand-to-hand combat originally referred principally to engagements by military personnel on the battlefield, it can also refer to any personal physical engagement by two or more combatants, including police officers and civilians. Combat within close quarters (to a range just beyond grappling distance) is commonly termed close combat or close-quarters combat. It may include lethal and nonlethal weapons and methods depending upon the restrictions imposed by civilian law, military rules of engagement, or personal ethical codes. Close combat using firearms or other distance weapons by military combatants at the tactical level is modernly referred to as close quarter battle. The U.S. Army uses the term combatives to describe various military martial art combat systems used in hand-to-hand combat training, systems which may incorporate hybrid techniques from several different martial arts and combat sports... Sometimes called close combat, Close Quarters Combat, or CQC, World War II-era American combatives were largely codified by William Ewart Fairbairn and Eric Anthony Sykes. Also known for their eponymous Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife, Fairbairn and Sykes had worked in the Shanghai Municipal Police (SMP) and helped teach police officers as well as units of the U.S. Marine Corps and the Royal Marines a quick and effective and simple technique for fighting with or without weapons in melee situations. Similar training was provided to British Commandos, the Devil's Brigade, OSS, U.S. Army Rangers and Marine Raiders. Fairbairn at one point called this system Defendu, and later publishing an instructional training manual on the system. Defendu was later revised into a method of "quick kill" hand-to-hand combat training for soldiers by Fairbairn which he called "gutter fighting". The Fairbairn system was adopted and expanded by a U.S. military close combat instructor, Rex Applegate, for training U.S. military and paramilitary forces. Similar training was provided to British Commandos, the Devil's Brigade, OSS, U.S. Army Rangers and the Marine Raiders. Applegate would later describe this method of training in his own book, Kill or Get Killed. Other combat systems having their origins in military combat include European Unifight, Chinese Sanshou, Soviet/Russian sambo and Rukopaschnij Boj, Israeli Kapap and Krav Maga and Indian Bison System. The prevalence and style of hand-to-hand combat training often changes based on perceived need. Elite units such as special forces and commando units tend to place higher emphasis on hand-to-hand combat training. Although hand-to-hand fighting was accorded less importance in major militaries after World War II, insurgency conflicts such as the Vietnam War, low intensity conflict and urban warfare have prompted many armies to pay more attention to this form of combat. When such fighting includes firearms designed for close-in fighting, it is often referred to as Close Quarters Battle (CQB) at the platoon or squad level, or Military Operations on Urban Terrain (MOUT) at higher tactical levels...
https://wn.com/Combat_Kill_Or_Be_Killed_1943_War_Department_World_War_Ii_US_Army_Training_Film
War Department: Culp's Hill

War Department: Culp's Hill

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:50
  • Updated: 31 May 2017
  • views: 2049
videos
Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Licensed Battlefield Guide Tim Smith and The Civil War Trust's Sam Smith debate whether or not the Confederate Army should have tried to take Culp's Hill on the first night of The Battle of Gettysburg.
https://wn.com/War_Department_Culp's_Hill
War Department Martial ArtsTraining - Part 1

War Department Martial ArtsTraining - Part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:41
  • Updated: 24 Apr 2008
  • views: 12886
videos
Training video from 1940s
https://wn.com/War_Department_Martial_Artstraining_Part_1
War Department: Unknown Little Round Top

War Department: Unknown Little Round Top

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:09
  • Updated: 19 Apr 2017
  • views: 5819
videos
You think you know Little Round Top? Licensed Battlefield Guides Garry Adelman and Tim Smith take viewers on a tour of some of the lesser known facts about the hill.
https://wn.com/War_Department_Unknown_Little_Round_Top
War Department Films of Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany

War Department Films of Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany

  • Order:
  • Duration: 59:17
  • Updated: 07 Apr 2012
  • views: 97732
videos
https://wn.com/War_Department_Films_Of_Concentration_Camps_In_Nazi_Germany
Radar Secrets ~ 1945 War Department; narrated by Arthur Kennedy

Radar Secrets ~ 1945 War Department; narrated by Arthur Kennedy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:03
  • Updated: 22 Sep 2016
  • views: 5807
videos
Radar playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL980B7449450779A2 more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ Post World War II explanation of radar and how it was used in the war. Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radar ...In 1922 A. Hoyt Taylor and Leo C. Young, researchers working with the U.S. Navy, discovered that when radio waves were broadcast at 60 MHz it was possible to determine the range and bearing of nearby ships in the Potomac River. Despite Taylor's suggestion that this method could be used in low visibility, the Navy did not immediately continue the work. Serious investigation began eight years later after the discovery that radar could be used to track airplanes. Before the Second World War, researchers in France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States, independently and in great secrecy, developed technologies that led to the modern version of radar. Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa followed prewar Great Britain, and Hungary had similar developments during the war. In 1934 the Frenchman Émile Girardeau stated he was building an obstacle-locating radio apparatus "conceived according to the principles stated by Tesla" and obtained a patent for a working system, a part of which was installed on the Normandie liner in 1935. During the same year, the Soviet military engineer P.K.Oschepkov, in collaboration with Leningrad Electrophysical Institute, produced an experimental apparatus, RAPID, capable of detecting an aircraft within 3 km of a receiver. The French and Soviet systems, however, had continuous-wave operation and could not give the full performance that was ultimately at the center of modern radar. Full radar evolved as a pulsed system, and the first such elementary apparatus was demonstrated in December 1934 by American Robert M. Page, working at the Naval Research Laboratory. The following year, the United States Army successfully tested a primitive surface to surface radar to aim coastal battery search lights at night. This was followed by a pulsed system demonstrated in May 1935 by Rudolf Kühnhold and the firm GEMA in Germany and then one in June 1935 by an Air Ministry team led by Robert A. Watson Watt in Great Britain. Later, in 1943, Page greatly improved radar with the monopulse technique that was used for many years in most radar applications. The British were the first to fully exploit radar as a defence against aircraft attack. This was spurred on by fears that the Germans were developing death rays. The Air Ministry asked British scientists in 1934 to investigate the possibility of propagating electromagnetic energy and the likely effect. Following a study, they concluded that a death ray was impractical but that detection of aircraft appeared feasible. Robert Watson Watt's team demonstrated to his superiors the capabilities of a working prototype and then patented the device. It served as the basis for the Chain Home network of radars to defend Great Britain. In April 1940, Popular Science showed an example of a radar unit using the Watson-Watt patent in an article on air defence, but not knowing that the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy were working on radars with the same principle, stated under the illustration, "This is not U.S. Army equipment." Also, in late 1941 Popular Mechanics had an article in which a U.S. scientist conjectured what he believed the British early warning system on the English east coast most likely looked like and was very close to what it actually was and how it worked in principle. The war precipitated research to find better resolution, more portability, and more features for radar, including complementary navigation systems like Oboe used by the RAF's Pathfinder...
https://wn.com/Radar_Secrets_~_1945_War_Department_Narrated_By_Arthur_Kennedy
Dogs in WWII: "The Use of War Dogs" 1943 War Department (US Army); K-9 Corps

Dogs in WWII: "The Use of War Dogs" 1943 War Department (US Army); K-9 Corps

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:56
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2013
  • views: 29740
videos
more at http://quickfound.net Overview of the work done by Army dogs in World War II. War Dept Film Bulletin 91. 'This film shows war dogs as they were trained by the Remount Section of the Quartermaster Corps. Scenes show dogs as they were being trained to lead patrols, to silently warn of the presence of enemies, and to seek out intruders. Scenes also show a messenger dog demonstrating how to deliver a message and return with needed ammunition; messenger dogs delivering carrier pigeons; laying wire on a battlefield; and a casualty dog helping his master locate wounded soldiers on a battlefield. Creator: Department of Defense. Department of the Army. Office of the Chief Signal Officer. (09/18/1947 - 02/28/1964) (Most Recent)' Public domain film from the United States National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogs_in_warfare Dogs in warfare have a long history starting in ancient times. From 'war dogs' trained in combat to their use as scouts, sentries and trackers, their uses have been varied and some continue to exist in modern military usage... In ancient times, dogs, often large mastiff- or molosser-type breeds, would be strapped with armor and spiked collars, and sent into battle to attack the enemy. This strategy was used by various civilizations, such as the Romans and the Greeks. This approach has been largely abandoned in modern day militaries due to the fact that modern weapons would allow the dogs to be killed almost immediately, as on Okinawa when U.S. soldiers quickly eliminated a platoon of Japanese soldiers and their dogs. Another program attempted during World War II was suggested by a Swiss citizen living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. William A. Prestre proposed using large dogs to kill Japanese soldiers. He convinced the military to lease an entire island in the Mississippi to house the training facilities. There the army hoped to train as many as two million dogs. The idea was to begin island invasions with landing craft releasing thousands of dogs against the Japanese defenders, then followed up by troops as the Japanese defenders scattered in confusion. One of the biggest problems encountered was getting Japanese soldiers to train the dogs with, as few Japanese soldiers were being captured. Eventually, Japanese-American soldiers volunteered for the training. The biggest problem was the dogs; either they were too docile, did not respond to training teaching them to rush across beaches, or were terrified by shellfire. After millions of dollars were spent, the program was abandoned. The Soviet Union used dogs for anti-tank purposes beginning in the 1930s... Contemporary dogs in military roles are also often referred to as police dogs, or in the United States as a Military Working Dog (MWD), or K-9. Their roles are nearly as varied as their ancient cousins, though they tend to be more rarely used in front-line formations. As of 2011, 600 U.S. Military dogs were actively participating in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Traditionally, the most common breed for these police-type operations has been the German Shepherd; in recent years there has been a shift to smaller dogs with keener senses of smell for detection work, and more resilient breeds such as the Belgian Malinois and Dutch Shepherd for patrolling and law enforcement. All MWDs in use today are paired with a single individual after their training. This person is called a handler. While a handler usually won't stay with one dog for the length of either's career, usually a handler will stay partnered with a dog for at least a year, and sometimes much longer. The latest canine tactical vests are outfitted with cameras and durable microphones that allow dogs to relay audio and visual information to their handlers. In the 1970s the US Air Force used over 1,600 dogs worldwide. Today, personnel cutbacks have reduced USAF dog teams to approximately 530, stationed throughout the world. Many dogs that operate in these roles are trained at Lackland Air Force Base, the only United States facility that currently trains dogs for military use. Change has also come in legislation for the benefit of the canines. Prior to 2000, older war dogs were required to be euthanized. Thanks to a new law, retired military dogs may now be adopted, one notable case of which was Lex, a working dog whose handler was killed in Iraq..
https://wn.com/Dogs_In_Wwii_The_Use_Of_War_Dogs_1943_War_Department_(Us_Army)_K_9_Corps
Strictly Personal - War Department official training film (US Army Pictorial Service, 1945)

Strictly Personal - War Department official training film (US Army Pictorial Service, 1945)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 35:14
  • Updated: 08 Aug 2013
  • views: 23348
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This film presents advice on fitness and health to servicewomen -- nutrition, rest, exercise, etc. The film gives an explanation of menses, personal hygiene, prevention of disease, care of the feet, etc. Produced by United States Army Pictorial Service Learn more about this film and search its transcript at NLM Digital Collections: http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/9422795 Learn more about the National Library of Medicine's historical audiovisuals program at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/films
https://wn.com/Strictly_Personal_War_Department_Official_Training_Film_(Us_Army_Pictorial_Service,_1945)
Death Mills 1945 US War Department Film

Death Mills 1945 US War Department Film

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  • Duration: 21:30
  • Updated: 30 Apr 2015
  • views: 1896
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Presented here for historical purposes, this film was released by the United States Department of War in 1945. It's purpose was to educate the German people about atrocities committed by the Nazi regime during the Holocaust. It contains footage of various liberated concentration camps, including the Majdanek death camp, the first of its kind to be liberated during the war. As this film was produced Department of War, which was a United States federal agency (its known as the defense department today), this film is in the public domain per 17 U.S.C. § 105
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Racial & Religious Propaganda: "Don't Be a Sucker" 1945 War Department Education Film; World War II

Racial & Religious Propaganda: "Don't Be a Sucker" 1945 War Department Education Film; World War II

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:40
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 2537
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World War II playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E5ED4749AE3CD2C Psychology & Social Guidance Films playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_KKDUI3dzMqPn1uZRXt_8dp more at http://quickfound.net 'Dramatizes the destructive effects of racial and religious prejudice. Reel 1 shows a fake wrestling match and "crooked" gambling games. An agitator addresses a street crowd; he almost convinces one man in the audience until the man begins to talk to a Hungarian refugee from Germany. A Nazi speaker harangues a crowd in Germany denouncing Jews, Catholics, and Freemasons. Reel 2, a German unemployed worker joins Hitler's Storm Troops. SS men attack Jewish and Catholic headquarters in Germany, and beat up a Jewish storekeeper. A German teacher explains Nazi racial theories; the teacher is dragged away by German soldiers.' Originally a public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prejudice Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The word prejudice refers to prejudgment: i.e. making a decision before becoming aware of the relevant facts of a case. In recent times, the word has come to be most often used to refer to preconceived, usually unfavorable, judgments toward people or a person because of gender, social class, age, disability, religion, sexuality, race/ethnicity, language, nationality or other personal characteristics. In this case it refers to a positive or negative evaluation of another person based on their group membership. Prejudice can also refer to unfounded beliefs and may include "any unreasonable attitude that is unusually resistant to rational influence." Gordon Allport defined prejudice as a "feeling, favorable or unfavorable, toward a person or thing, prior to, or not based on, actual experience... In 1954, Gordon Allport linked prejudice and categorical thinking. Allport claims prejudice is in part a normal process for humans. According to him, "The human mind must think with the aid of categories... Once formed, categories are the basis for normal prejudgment. We cannot possibly avoid this process. Orderly living depends upon it." In the 1970s, research began to show that much of prejudice is based not on negative feelings towards other groups but favoritism towards one's own groups. According to Marilyn Brewer, prejudice "may develop not because outgroups are hated, but because positive emotions such as admiration, sympathy, and trust are reserved for the ingroup... Racism Racism is defined as the belief that races exist, that physical characteristics determine cultural traits, and that racial characteristics make some groups superior. By separating people into hierarchies based upon their race, it has been argued that unequal treatment among the different groups of people is just and fair due to their genetic differences. Racism can occur amongst any group that can be identified based upon physical features or even characteristics of their culture. Though people may be lumped together and called a specific race, everyone does not fit neatly into such categories, making it hard to define and describe a race accurately...
https://wn.com/Racial_Religious_Propaganda_Don't_Be_A_Sucker_1945_War_Department_Education_Film_World_War_Ii
Don't Be A Sucker (1947) | U.S. War Department

Don't Be A Sucker (1947) | U.S. War Department

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  • Duration: 5:13
  • Updated: 30 Jan 2017
  • views: 8432
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Don't believe the haters Full movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag40XYIj4hE
https://wn.com/Don't_Be_A_Sucker_(1947)_|_U.S._War_Department
War Department: The Myth of Stonewall Jackson

War Department: The Myth of Stonewall Jackson

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  • Duration: 2:16
  • Updated: 19 Jul 2017
  • views: 5139
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Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Garry Adelman debunks myths regarding Thomas Jackson's famous nickname in this episode of the War Department™ video series by the Civil War Trust.
https://wn.com/War_Department_The_Myth_Of_Stonewall_Jackson
War Department: Shock and Awe at Bull Run

War Department: Shock and Awe at Bull Run

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  • Duration: 13:05
  • Updated: 10 Apr 2017
  • views: 2832
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Civil War Trust and National Park Service staff analyze the Battle of Bull Run in this episode of the War Department™ video series by the Civil War Trust. Learn More at: http://www.civilwar.org/education/war-department/
https://wn.com/War_Department_Shock_And_Awe_At_Bull_Run
Official Training Film War Department (1942) - Sex Hygiene

Official Training Film War Department (1942) - Sex Hygiene

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  • Duration: 25:54
  • Updated: 31 May 2013
  • views: 3012
videos
https://wn.com/Official_Training_Film_War_Department_(1942)_Sex_Hygiene
U.S. War Department: "Tale of Two Cities" 1946 - Nagasaki & Hiroshima Nuclear Bombs

U.S. War Department: "Tale of Two Cities" 1946 - Nagasaki & Hiroshima Nuclear Bombs

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  • Duration: 12:03
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2011
  • views: 1189
videos
https://wn.com/U.S._War_Department_Tale_Of_Two_Cities_1946_Nagasaki_Hiroshima_Nuclear_Bombs
War Department: A Bloodstained Artifact from Gettysburg

War Department: A Bloodstained Artifact from Gettysburg

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  • Duration: 3:16
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2017
  • views: 2966
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Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Garry Adelman and Douglas Ullman, Jr. meet with Wayne Motts of The National Civil War Museum to look at artifacts owned by Captain Henry Fuller, who was killed in The Battle of Gettysburg. Adelman and Small also visit the site where Fuller took his final breaths.
https://wn.com/War_Department_A_Bloodstained_Artifact_From_Gettysburg
Official Training Film War Department (1945) - The M2 Carbine

Official Training Film War Department (1945) - The M2 Carbine

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  • Duration: 14:34
  • Updated: 31 May 2013
  • views: 3574
videos
https://wn.com/Official_Training_Film_War_Department_(1945)_The_M2_Carbine
1916 Sunbeam War Department Motorcycle

1916 Sunbeam War Department Motorcycle

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  • Duration: 0:23
  • Updated: 05 Oct 2008
  • views: 15998
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1916 built Sunbeam War Department Model Motorcycle, as used in the First World War by dispatch riders of the Royal Engineers
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Americans! "Don't Be A Sucker" - U.S. War Department

Americans! "Don't Be A Sucker" - U.S. War Department

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  • Duration: 7:08
  • Updated: 13 Aug 2017
  • views: 5815
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Don't Be a Sucker by U.S. War Department View the full-length video: https://archive.org/details/DontBeaS1947 Publication date 1947 Usage Public Domain Topics Prejudice, Cold War, Racism Digitizing sponsor U.S. War Department Admonishes Americans that they will lose their country if they let fanaticism and hatred turn them into "suckers." "Let's forget about 'we' and 'they' -- let's think about us!" In the context of the emerging Cold War, this film appears paradoxical. Shotlist Like The House I Live In, this film warns that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into "suckers" by the forces of fanaticism and hatred. This thesis is rendered more powerful by the ever-present example of Nazi Germany, whose capsule history is dramatized as part of this film. There's a great deal of good sense in this film and more than a bit of wartime populism: "Let's not think about 'we' and 'they.' Let's think about 'us'!"] It's interesting to think of this film in the light of Cold War anti-Communist politics, which really came into their own in the year this film was made. Were the witch-hunting politicians and citizens of the late Forties and early Fifties protecting the people, or were they themselves acting like "suckers?"
https://wn.com/Americans_Don't_Be_A_Sucker_U.S._War_Department
War Department: Berdan's Sharpshooters at Gettysburg

War Department: Berdan's Sharpshooters at Gettysburg

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  • Duration: 10:12
  • Updated: 29 Sep 2017
  • views: 122
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Learn More at: https://www.civilwar.org/ Garry Adelman, Douglas Ullman Jr. and Kristopher White of the Civil War Trust are joined by Greg Goodell of the Gettysburg National Military Park to examine an impressive collection of artifacts from the U.S. Sharpshooters.
https://wn.com/War_Department_Berdan's_Sharpshooters_At_Gettysburg
Post-WW2 Anti-Fascist Educational Film | Don't Be a Sucker | 1947

Post-WW2 Anti-Fascist Educational Film | Don't Be a Sucker | 1947

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:08
  • Updated: 12 Mar 2017
  • views: 310417
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● CHECK OUT OUR 2ND CHANNEL: https://youtube.com/TheBestSpaceArchives ✚ Watch our "Old America" PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaGAbbh1M3ImKavW8ZY0aZyFK1c-PLCAj ►Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheBestFilmArchives ►Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TheBestFilmArchives ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BestFilmArch Don't Be a Sucker! is a short educational film produced by the U.S. War Department in 1943 and re-released in 1947. The film depicts the rise of Nazism in Germany and warns Americans against repeating the mistakes of intolerance made in Nazi Germany. It emphasizes that Americans will lose their country if they let themselves be turned into "suckers" by the forces of fanaticism and hatred. The film was made to make the case for the desegregation of the United States armed forces by simply revealing the connection between prejudice and fascism. This film is not propaganda. To the contrary, it teaches how to recognize and reject propaganda, as was used by the Nazis to promote to bigotry and intimidation. It shows how prejudice can be used to divide the population to gain power. Far more significantly, it then shows how such tactics can be defanged by friendly persuasion; that protection of liberty is a unifying and practical way to live peacefully. Plot: A young American Free Mason is taken in by the message of a soap-box orator who asserts that all good jobs in the United States are being taken by the so-called minorities, domestic and foreign. He falls into a conversation with Hungarian professor who witnessed the rise of Nazism in Berlin and who tells him of the pattern of events that brought Hitler to power in Germany and how Germany's anti-democratic groups split the country into helpless minorities, each hating the other. The professor concludes by pointing out that America is composed of many minorities, but all are united as Americans. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT Nazi Germany is the common English name for the period in German history from 1933 to 1945, when Germany was governed by a dictatorship under the control of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party (NSDAP). Under Hitler's rule, Germany was transformed into a fascist state in which the Nazi Party took totalitarian control over nearly all aspects of life. The official name of the state was Deutsches Reich from 1933 to 1943 and Großdeutsches Reich ("Greater German Reich") from 1943 to 1945. The period is also known under the names the Third Reich (German: Drittes Reich) and the National Socialist Period (German: Zeit des Nationalsozialismus, abbreviated as NS-Zeit). The Nazi regime came to an end after the Allied Powers defeated Germany in May 1945, ending World War 2 in Europe. Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany by the President of the Weimar Republic Paul von Hindenburg on 30 January 1933. The Nazi Party then began to eliminate all political opposition and consolidate its power. Hindenburg died on 2 August 1934, and Hitler became dictator of Germany by merging the powers and offices of the Chancellery and Presidency. A national referendum held 19 August 1934 confirmed Hitler as sole Führer (leader) of Germany. All power was centralized in Hitler's person, and his word became above all laws. Racism, especially antisemitism, was a central feature of the regime. The Germanic peoples (the Nordic race) were considered by the Nazis to be the purest branch of the Aryan race, and were therefore viewed as the master race. Millions of Jews and other peoples deemed undesirable by the state were murdered in the Holocaust. Opposition to Hitler's rule was ruthlessly suppressed. Members of the liberal, socialist, and communist opposition were killed, imprisoned, or exiled. The Christian churches were also oppressed, with many leaders imprisoned. Education focused on racial biology, population policy, and fitness for military service. Career and educational opportunities for women were curtailed. Propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels made effective use of film, mass rallies, and Hitler's hypnotizing oratory to control public opinion. The government controlled artistic expression, promoting specific art forms and banning or discouraging others. Following the Allied invasion of Normandy (6 June, 1944), Germany was conquered by the Soviet Union from the east and the other Allied powers from the west and capitulated within a year. The victorious Allies initiated a policy of denazification and put many of the surviving Nazi leadership on trial for war crimes at the Nuremberg trials. Post-WW2 Anti-Fascist Educational Film | Don't Be a Sucker | 1947 TBFA_0103 NOTE: THE VIDEO REPRESENTS HISTORICAL EVENTS. SINCE IT WAS PRODUCED DECADES AGO, IT HAS HISTORICAL VALUES AND CAN BE CONSIDERED AS A VALUABLE HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. THE VIDEO HAS BEEN UPLOADED WITH EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. ITS TOPIC IS REPRESENTED WITHIN HISTORICAL CONTEXT. THE VIDEO DOES NOT CONTAIN SENSITIVE SCENES AT ALL!
https://wn.com/Post_WW2_Anti_Fascist_Educational_Film_|_Don't_Be_A_Sucker_|_1947